Incerteza viva [Live Uncertainty]
32nd Bienal de São Paulo

Curated by: Jochen Volz
Co-curators: Lars Bang Larsen, Gabi Ngcobo, Sofía Olascoaga, Júlia Rebouças

 

Bienal Pavilion
São Paulo, Brazil
10 September – 11 December 2016

The 32nd Bienal de São Paulo, INCERTEZA VIVA (Live Uncertainty) in 2016 proposed to “look at notions of uncertainty and the strategies offered by contemporary art to embrace or inhabit it.” It was curated by Jochen Volz, the General Director of Pinacoteca de São Paulo, with co-curators Lars Bang Larsen, Gabi Ngcobo, Sofía Olascoaga, Júlia Rebouças, who together established a powerful theoretical approach rooted in precariousness. “While stability is understood as a remedy against anxiety,” the curators explain, “uncertainty is generally avoided or denied. The arts, though, have always played on the unknown. Historically, art has insisted on vocabularies that allow for fiction and otherness, and it dwells on the incapacity of existing means to describe the systems we are part of. Uncertainty in art points to creation, taking into account ambiguity and contradiction. Art feeds off chance, improvisation and speculation. It leaves room for error, for doubt and even for the most profound misgivings without evading or manipulating them. Art is grounded on imagination, and only through imagination will we be able to envision other narratives for our past and new ways into the future.”

Incerteza viva [Live Uncertainty]
32nd Bienal de São Paulo

Curated by: Jochen Volz
Co-curators: Lars Bang Larsen, Gabi Ngcobo, Sofía Olascoaga, Júlia Rebouças

Bienal Pavilion
São Paulo, Brazil
10 September – 11 December 2016

The 32nd Bienal de São Paulo, INCERTEZA VIVA (Live Uncertainty) in 2016 proposed to “look at notions of uncertainty and the strategies offered by contemporary art to embrace or inhabit it.” It was curated by Jochen Volz, the General Director of Pinacoteca de São Paulo, with co-curators Lars Bang Larsen, Gabi Ngcobo, Sofía Olascoaga, Júlia Rebouças, who together established a powerful theoretical approach rooted in precariousness. “While stability is understood as a remedy against anxiety,” the curators explain, “uncertainty is generally avoided or denied. The arts, though, have always played on the unknown. Historically, art has insisted on vocabularies that allow for fiction and otherness, and it dwells on the incapacity of existing means to describe the systems we are part of. Uncertainty in art points to creation, taking into account ambiguity and contradiction. Art feeds off chance, improvisation and speculation. It leaves room for error, for doubt and even for the most profound misgivings without evading or manipulating them. Art is grounded on imagination, and only through imagination will we be able to envision other narratives for our past and new ways into the future.”

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