Scratched Surfaces, as Diamond against Crystal

This exhibition was Carlos Garaicoa’s debut exhibition at Goodman Gallery, London. Garaicoa is one of Cuba’s most significant contemporary artists. Through a multidisciplinary approach, Garaicoa addresses issues of culture and politics with a reflexive lens into architecture, urbanism and history.

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Histórias afro-atlânticas

Histórias afro-atlânticas (Afro-Atlantic Histories) was the second in the “historias” series, taking place across two major venues in São Paulo in 2018 – Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand (MASP) and Instituto Tomie Ohtake. The exhibition was motivated by an exploration of parallels and frictions across what Paul Gilroy termed the Black Atlantic, considering the visual cultures of Afro-Atlantic territories – their experiences, creations, patterns of worship and philosophy.

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Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today

Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today, forming part of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, presented a nuanced reconsideration of contemporary art in Latin America. According to curator Pablo León de la Barra, this extensive show aimed to present “a diversity of creative responses to a rich cultural context shaped by colonialism, civil conflict, economic crisis, social inequality, and repression – as well as by intervals of growth and the emergence of parallel modernities”.

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Imagine Brazil

In a powerful research project initiated by Astrup Fearnley Museet, Imagine Brazil showcased Brazilian contemporary art through a compelling curatorial approach. Exhibition curators Gunnar B. Kvaran, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Thierry Raspail invited a group of emergent Brazilian artists to produce new work, and in addition select an older artist who they considered influential, to accompany them in the exhibition.

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Bienal de la Habana, 1984, 1986

The Bienal de la Habana, when first established in 1984 offered a singular and crucial meeting place for art from the region, exhibiting artists solely from Latin America and the Caribbean. In the second edition in 1986, the Bienal included art from Africa, Asia and the Middle East, becoming one of the most important platforms for artists from outside the West.

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